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Upcoming Classes


Fall 2022 Class Descriptions

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
1
Topic:
Same Difference
Instructor:
Daniel Bosch
Meets: MW 8:30 A - 9:45 A
Description: “
Comparisons are odious,” Don Quixote tells us. Yet the most common writing assignment given in college classes, regardless of discipline, is the comparison and contrast essay. Same Difference takes its cue from this tension, and participants in it will compose four substantial projects, each of which require very careful reading, extensive analysis, and deep revision (one project entails a live vocal presentation). In Same Difference we will compare and contrast photographic images, sentences, accounts of evidence, poems, paragraphs, and writing strategies, and we will continuously seek to reflect critically on the epistemological value of such tools.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
2
Topic:
Struggles for Social Justice
Instructor: 
Mahmuda Sharmin & Nesar Uddin
Meets: MW 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description: 
This course will introduce learners with rhetorical tools to develop their skills necessary for analysis and production of academic writing. In this class, learners will critically read a number of multilingual writers’ literacy narratives depicting their challenges for literacy development. Learners will also read to analyze the rhetorical traditions that African American writers use in their arguments. Learners will writer their own literacy narratives and recognize how rhetoric functions by analyzing arguments and developing their own researched-based arguments. Learners will transition from textual arguments to multimodal forms through process writing approach.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
3
Topic:
Monstrosity and Modernity
Instructor:
Ruixue Zhang
Meets: MW 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description:
Joseph Conrad says that “the belief in supernatural source of evil is not necessary; men alone are quite capable of every wickedness.” Characterized by mass production and consumption, modernity has created many “wicked monsters” –human and non-human. In this

writing course, we are going to analyze the rhetorical situations underlying these monster-making discourses and conduct research centering on two central questions: how is

monstrosity related to our concepts of race, gender, sexuality, social class, and even mental health? How does writing solidify or destroy these concepts? Throughout critical reading and rhetorical analysis, students are supposed to produce a literary review, a research article, a multimodal project, and a portfolio. We hope, through our reading and writing process, to reflect upon our experience of modernity and find out possible solutions to problems caused by it.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
4
Topic:
Struggles for Social Justice
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin & Nesar Uddin
Meets: MW 2:30 P - 3:45 P
Description: 
This course will introduce learners with rhetorical tools to develop their skills necessary for analysis and production of academic writing. In this class, learners will critically read a number of multilingual writers’ literacy narratives depicting their challenges for literacy development. Learners will also read to analyze the rhetorical traditions that African American writers use in their arguments. Learners will writer their own literacy narratives and recognize how rhetoric functions by analyzing arguments and developing their own researched-based arguments. Learners will transition from textual arguments to multimodal forms through process writing approach.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
5
Topic:
College Education: Crisis and Controversy
Instructor:
Bernard Krumm
Meets: TuTh 8:30 A - 9:45 A
Description: 
Our course will investigate a number of topics, debates, and controversies regarding higher education. We will consider the cost of a college education, issues involving enrollments and department cuts, the often-competing imperatives of career preparation, the "college experience," and "knowledge for its own sake," the problems and benefits of online learning, and other hot-button issues that have attracted both academic study and media scrutiny. In doing so, we will learn and practice the basics of argumentation and research. We will also analyze and imitate the conventions and expectations of multiple genres of writing (the research article, the op-ed, the personal essay, etc.), as well as other media. Above all, we will pursue a process-orientated, recursive approach to composition that treats writing as entering a conversation. Assignments may include a rhetorical analysis, a research article, and regular personal reflections.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
6
Topic:
Goosebumps
Instructor:
Margy Adams
Meets: MW 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
Reading Sound, Hearing Words - For as much as we live in language, we are also confined by it. How, then, do we make linguistic sense of that which may appear beyond our textual reach? How may we communicate that which seems incommunicable -- the heart-wrenching denouement of Tchaikovsky’s Symphonie Pathétique, the ethereal harmonies of Beyonce’s “Bigger,” the “funny feeling” of Bo Burnham’s Inside, the sound of your grandmother’s voice as she tells you a story? Conversely, can we determine anything -- about us, our societies, or our histories -- from the ways things sound, and how can we translate these examinations into text? In this course, we will explore how to do what we can with the linguistic and rhetorical tools that we have by applying our language skills to sound and music. We will study a variety of forms, from film scores to poetry, and practice writing effective, cohesive analyses about them by crafting research papers, memoirs, multimodal narratives, and compiling portfolios of our work. By the end of the semester, through learning how to critically listen, our understanding of writing -- and our relationship to it -- will be enriched.

Potential interlocutors (aside from Beyonce, Burnham, and Tchaikovsky) may include Nella Larsen, Ocean Vuong, Michael Giacchino, Natasha Trethewey, and Jessye Norman.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
7
Topic:
Modern Loneliness
Instructor: Lucy Wallitsch
Meets: TuTh 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description:
In this composition course, we will explore the experience of loneliness through a range of genres and discourses. As a lived experience which is currently undergoing medical definition and development vis-à-vis the “loneliness epidemic,” and the massive cultural shifts which have come with the COVID-19 pandemic, loneliness will provide the class with a case-study in the development of new medical terminology and treatment for experiences which have existed up unto this point as un-pathologized portions of the human condition.

In this class, loneliness will serve as an entry point into larger cultural conversations surrounding identity, embodiment, and community as written in various mediums, genres, and discourse communities. Throughout the course, you will have opportunities to hone your analytic and communication skills through writing, critical thinking, close reading, and visual analysis. You will write in many genres, including memoir, research articles, multimodal genres,

and reflective work, and will spend significant time revising your work for inclusion in the writing portfolio.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
8
Topic:
Native American Voices
Instructor:
Mandy Suhr-Systma
Meets: TuTh 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description:
In this interdisciplinary writing course, we will read the 2019 non-fiction book An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People and engage several short works of writing, visual art, and film by Indigenous creators. In addition to readings, class activities, regular short writing assignments, and the portfolio/cover letter required in all first-year writing classes, students will complete three major projects: a paper analyzing a Native news media text, a multimodal presentation on a contemporary Indigenous leader, and a narrative nonfiction essay reflecting on personal experiences learning about Indigenous peoples.

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
9
Topic:
Native American Voices
Instructor:
Mandy Suhr-Systma
Meets: TuTh 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
In this interdisciplinary writing course, we will read the 2019 non-fiction book An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People and engage several short works of writing, visual art, and film by Indigenous creators. In addition to readings, class activities, regular short writing assignments, and the portfolio/cover letter required in all first-year writing classes, students will complete three major projects: a paper analyzing a Native news media text, a multimodal presentation on a contemporary Indigenous leader, and a narrative nonfiction essay reflecting on personal experiences learning about Indigenous peoples.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
10
Topic:
Communicating Climate Change
Instructor:
Mitch Murray
Meets: TuTh 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description:
There is no facet of experience now untouched by climate change. If rhetoric can be understood as the theory, practice, and art of ethical communication, then developing rigorous modes of communicating climate change is now one of its central tasks. This is a challenge, to say the least. After all, how do we communicate about something that can make

us feel so bad? How to we confront, and sustain the attention and commitment to write about, something as apocalyptic as climate change? In this course, we will collectively try. To aid us, we will read environmental activists, political theorists, philosophers, and scholars of literature and culture including Rachel Carson, Naomi Klein, Greta Thunberg, Min Hyoung Song, Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò, and The Red Nation. These communicators, moreover, will help us better grasp climate changes social effects and the ways in intersects with racism, white supremacy, colonialism, imperialism, and capitalism.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
11
Topic:
Communicating Climate Change
Instructor:
Mitch Murray
Meets:
TuTh 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
There is no facet of experience now untouched by climate change. If rhetoric can be understood as the theory, practice, and art of ethical communication, then developing rigorous modes of communicating climate change is now one of its central tasks. This is a challenge, to say the least. After all, how do we communicate about something that can make us feel so bad? How to we confront, and sustain the attention and commitment to write about, something as apocalyptic as climate change? In this course, we will collectively try. To aid us, we will read environmental activists, political theorists, philosophers, and scholars of literature and culture including Rachel Carson, Naomi Klein, Greta Thunberg, Min Hyoung Song, Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò, and The Red Nation. These communicators, moreover, will help us better grasp climate changes social effects and the ways in intersects with racism, white supremacy, colonialism, imperialism, and capitalism.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
12
Topic:
Memory, History, and Archives: Writing Through Time
Instructor:
Em Nordling
Meets: TuTh 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
This course will explore how we remember our lives, how our context shapes our memory, and how we write our memory into historical narratives. With memory and history as backdrops, we’ll discover new ways to think about our writing, including how to use writing as a thinking tool and how to write for different audiences.

This focus will help us consider the relationship between language, community, and social struggle; the power of the sources we use and cite; and how to read critically. Major assignments include a personal essay, history essay, and creative interpretation of an imagined museum exhibit, culminating in a final portfolio.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
13
Topic:
The Tropics are Topical: Botany, Empire, Colonialism
Instructor:
Apala Bhowmick
Meets: TuTh 8:30 A - 9:45 A
Description:
The objective of this composition course is to make us curious observers, brave critical thinkers, and sharp writers who can express their thoughts with coherence, clarity, and sophistication within their respective fields of study. Assignments will include a photo essay; a creative non-fiction piece, and a book/film review. We’ll discuss how the various imperial forces throughout history (French, British, Dutch, and Portuguese) have imposed their presence in their geographical colonies by altering the botanical elements native to these lands. Not all intentions were nefarious, however. Sometimes, conversations among both the colonizer and the indigenes brought forth important scientific discoveries about plants, which lead to intellectually exciting and creatively accomplished final results. Working with images (painting and film), narratives (novels, short stories, ethnographic reports), poetry, and archival documents, we will learn how to cultivate our own writing abilities by connecting our research with practical observation. Among the readings will be works by W.J.T. Mitchell, Jamaica Kincaid, John Berger, Amitav Ghosh, W.S. Merwin, and Sumana Roy.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
14
Topic:
Nature & Environmental Writing
Instructor:
Christopher Merwin
Meets: TuTh 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description:
This intensive writing course focuses on nature and environmental writing with readings from predominantly American nature writers and conservationists about the environment. We'll focus on thinking about environment philosophically, through Native American writers like Chief Luther Standing Bear, along with American transcendentalists like Emerson and Thoreau, conservationists Nan Shepherd and Annie Dillard, and environmental activists like Rebecca Solnit. Throughout the course we will hone our writing skills through multimodal reflections on/in nature and environmentally focused papers, narratives, and projects.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading - ELL
Section:
15
Topic:
Nature & Environmental Writing
Instructor:
Christopher Merwin
Meets: TuTh 5:30 P - 6:45
Description:
This intensive writing course focuses on nature and environmental writing with readings from predominantly American nature writers and conservationists about the environment. We'll focus on thinking about environment philosophically, through Native American writers like Chief Luther Standing Bear, along with American transcendentalists like Emerson and Thoreau, conservationists Nan Shepherd and Annie Dillard, and environmental activists like Rebecca Solnit. Throughout the course we will hone our writing skills through multimodal reflections on/in nature and environmentally focused papers, narratives, and projects.

This is an English Language Learner (ELL) course. Contact Jane O'Connor (jcoconn@emory.edu) for permission to enroll.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
16
Topic:
Ocean Exposition: Writing Marine Life
Instructor:
Kathleen Leuschen
Meets: MW 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description:
The position of the writer is one much like a doorway—writers are the conduits between the discourses and demands of the outside world and the dreams and logic of one’s own inner landscape. Author Ta-Nehisi Coates describes the act of writing as “the art of thinking” which surpasses the mere transcription of words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. Writing, as Coates explains, can be and often is “a confrontation with [one’s] own innocence, [one’s] own rationalizations.” In this expository writing class, students will learn to embody writing as a personal “art of thinking” space. Students will write to explore concepts like genre, rhetoric, revision, academic discourse, and critical thinking, while further developing and honing their own methods and styles of writing. Students will achieve this through a thematic exploration of oceanic and marine life discourses. Course texts will be culled from a variety of academic disciplines offering students an array of conceptual lenses and approaches to writing about the underwater world.  Course assignments include a variety of informal and formal genres including digital and multimodal, and the course culminates in a revised writing portfolio of students’ observations and arguments. 

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
17
Topic:
Struggles for Social Justice
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin & Nesar Uddin
Meets: MW 8:30 A - 9:45 A
Description: 
This course will introduce learners with rhetorical tools to develop their skills necessary for analysis and production of academic writing. In this class, learners will critically read a number of multilingual writers’ literacy narratives depicting their challenges for literacy development. Learners will also read to analyze the rhetorical traditions that African American writers use in their arguments. Learners will writer their own literacy narratives and recognize how rhetoric functions by analyzing arguments and developing their own researched-based arguments. Learners will transition from textual arguments to multimodal forms through process writing approach.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
18
Topic:
The Stories We Tell
Instructor:
Hannah Griggs
Meets: TuTh 5:30 P - 6:45 P
Description:
In this class we will examine the ways in which we use language to tell a story, exploring how we can use narrative to examine various social, political, and cultural issues surrounding us. This course uses narrative as a way to effectively consider and shape our writing practices. “Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly,” wrote Aldous Huxley, “they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.” This semester, you will learn how to wield words so that they pierce, hook, and drag audiences into your story. By the end of the course you will have written three papers: an op-ed, a profile, and an object lesson. You will learn that good writing is a process-based endeavor that requires many steps including brainstorming, topic generation, research, analysis, organization, and revision. You will develop the writing and revision skills that will serve as a solid base for you to build upon. In sum, you will finish this course with the ability to turn anything into a story.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
19
Topic:
The Stories We Tell
Instructor:
Hannah Griggs
Meets: TuTh 7:00 P - 8:15 P
Description:
In this class we will examine the ways in which we use language to tell a story, exploring how we can use narrative to examine various social, political, and cultural issues surrounding us. This course uses narrative as a way to effectively consider and shape our writing practices. “Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly,” wrote Aldous Huxley, “they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.” This semester, you will learn how to wield words so that they pierce, hook, and drag audiences into your story. By the end of the course you will have written three papers: an op-ed, a profile, and an object lesson. You will learn that good writing is a process-based endeavor that requires many steps including brainstorming, topic generation, research, analysis, organization, and revision. You will develop the writing and revision skills that will serve as a solid base for you to build upon. In sum, you will finish this course with the ability to turn anything into a story.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
20
Topic:
Tides Are Rising
Instructor:
Julian Currents
Meets: TuTh 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description:
The tides are rising. As global temperatures destabilize, there is no doubt that some of the most environmentally exposed lives are those on coastal shores. Whether imagined as landscapes of paradise, expanses of extreme loneliness, destinations for psychological escape, or metaphors for vulnerability, the coast is often positioned in art and global discourse as a platform for raising questions of ethics, identity, class, gender, race, and empire. In this first year writing course, we will examine the variety of ways in which coastal shores have been rendered in media and we will explore what these renderings might suggest about our future on this planet. Students will practice writing as a recursive process while developing the skills necessary to compose in multiple genres through a series of creative and analytic assignments. This course has an ecocritical focus and will address fiction and nonfiction, film and photography, as well as contemporary critical discourses concerning how coastal communities are impacted by climate collapse. Authors will include Derek Walcott, Jamaica Kincaid, Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio, and Kei Miller, among others.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
21
Topic:
Tides Are Rising
Instructor:
Julian Currents
Meets: TuTh 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description:
The tides are rising. As global temperatures destabilize, there is no doubt that some of the most environmentally exposed lives are those on coastal shores. Whether imagined as landscapes of paradise, expanses of extreme loneliness, destinations for psychological escape, or metaphors for vulnerability, the coast is often positioned in art and global discourse as a platform for raising questions of ethics, identity, class, gender, race, and empire. In this first year writing course, we will examine the variety of ways in which coastal shores have been rendered in media and we will explore what these renderings might suggest about our future on this planet. Students will practice writing as a recursive process while developing the skills necessary to compose in multiple genres through a series of creative and analytic assignments. This course has an ecocritical focus and will address fiction and nonfiction, film and photography, as well as contemporary critical discourses concerning how coastal communities are impacted by climate collapse. Authors will include Derek Walcott, Jamaica Kincaid, Jamaica Heolimeleikalani Osorio, and Kei Miller, among others.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
22
Topic:
Alien Bodies
Instructor:
Donna McDermott
Meets: MW 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description:
Writing about Science, Real and Imagined--Earth has nearly nine million different species of living organism that science fiction creators can draw inspiration from, yet nearly every alien on TV is shaped like a human. Why? And what does this tell us about the influences of art, the concentrations of power in our society, and the wonky ideas many people have about science? In this course, you'll explore this central question by reading, writing, and talking about aliens in fiction and real creatures on Earth. You'll use scholarly inquiry to critically analyze the social and biological implications of stories about alien life, ranging from blockbuster Marvel movies to the nuanced social commentary of Samuel R. Delaney, N.K. Jemisin, and Ursula Le Guin. You'll write as scientists and journalists do, composing scientific research commentary, memoir, and radio news segments. We'll even venture into the worldbuilding of creative writing. Through this, you'll build the skills you need to write thoughtfully and powerfully for a range of different audiences and contexts.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
23
Topic:
College Education: Crisis and Controversy
Instructor: 
Bernard Krumm
Meets: TuTh 2:30 P - 3:45 P
Description: 
Our course will investigate a number of topics, debates, and controversies regarding higher education. We will consider the cost of a college education, issues involving enrollments and department cuts, the often-competing imperatives of career preparation, the "college experience," and "knowledge for its own sake," the problems and benefits of online learning, and other hot-button issues that have attracted both academic study and media scrutiny. In doing so, we will learn and practice the basics of argumentation and research. We will also analyze and imitate the conventions and expectations of multiple genres of writing (the research article, the op-ed, the personal essay, etc.), as well as other media. Above all, we will pursue a process-orientated, recursive approach to composition that treats writing as entering a conversation. Assignments may include a rhetorical analysis, a research article, and regular personal reflections.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
24
Topic:
College Education: Crisis and Controversy
Instructor: 
Bernard Krumm
Meets: TuTh 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description: 
Our course will investigate a number of topics, debates, and controversies regarding higher education. We will consider the cost of a college education, issues involving enrollments and department cuts, the often-competing imperatives of career preparation, the "college experience," and "knowledge for its own sake," the problems and benefits of online learning, and other hot-button issues that have attracted both academic study and media scrutiny. In doing so, we will learn and practice the basics of argumentation and research. We will also analyze and imitate the conventions and expectations of multiple genres of writing (the research article, the op-ed, the personal essay, etc.), as well as other media. Above all, we will pursue a process-orientated, recursive approach to composition that treats writing as entering a conversation. Assignments may include a rhetorical analysis, a research article, and regular personal reflections.

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading for English Language Learners (ELL)
Section:
15
Topic:
Nature & Environmental Writing
Instructor:
Christopher Merwin
Meets: TuTh 5:30 P - 6:45
Description:
This intensive writing course focuses on nature and environmental writing with readings from predominantly American nature writers and conservationists about the environment. We'll focus on thinking about environment philosophically, through Native American writers like Chief Luther Standing Bear, along with American transcendentalists like Emerson and Thoreau, conservationists Nan Shepherd and Annie Dillard, and environmental activists like Rebecca Solnit. Throughout the course we will hone our writing skills through multimodal reflections on/in nature and environmentally focused papers, narratives, and projects.

This is an English Language Learner (ELL) course. Contact Jane O'Connor (jcoconn@emory.edu) for permission to enroll.

Course: ENGRD 123R – Communicative Grammar
Section:
1
Instructor:
Jane O’Connor
Meets: W 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
ENGRD 123R is an intensive grammar course designed specifically to prepare students for whom English is an additional language for the communicative expectations and challenges they may encounter over the course their academic careers. This course will focus on researching, analyzing and practicing English grammar in order to develop students' knowledge of form, meaning and usage, while providing continuous and responsive feedback. Through a variety of activities and texts we will study, practice and refine grammatical accuracy for the purpose of expressing clear and precise meanings. At times I will use lecture and focused activities to introduce specific grammar points that are important for additional language learners; in other lessons, students will discover the nuances of grammar usage by reading texts or using corpus linguistics; additionally, students will have ample opportunity to practice and apply what they have learned to revise and refine their own academic writing. We will look at both more serious global concerns that can affect a reader's general comprehension of the work (such as verb tense) and less serious local concerns that can result in an impreciseness of meaning (such as verb form). What are the choices we make as we construct meaning and how can different choices affect meaning?

Enrollment by permission only from Jane O'Connor. Class to be taken with ENGRD 101.

Course: ENGRD 123R – Communicative Grammar
Section:
2
Instructor:
Jane O’Connor
Meets: W 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description:
ENGRD 123R is an intensive grammar course designed specifically to prepare students for whom English is an additional language for the communicative expectations and challenges they may encounter over the course their academic careers. This course will focus on researching, analyzing and practicing English grammar in order to develop students' knowledge of form, meaning and usage, while providing continuous and responsive feedback. Through a variety of activities and texts we will study, practice and refine grammatical accuracy for the purpose of expressing clear and precise meanings. At times I will use lecture and focused activities to introduce specific grammar points that are important for additional language learners; in other lessons, students will discover the nuances of grammar usage by reading texts or using corpus linguistics; additionally, students will have ample opportunity to practice and apply what they have learned to revise and refine their own academic writing. We will look at both more serious global concerns that can affect a reader's general comprehension of the work (such as verb tense) and less serious local concerns that can result in an impreciseness of meaning (such as verb form). What are the choices we make as we construct meaning and how can different choices affect meaning?

Enrollment by permission only from Jane O'Connor. Class to be taken with ENGRD 101.

Course: ENGRD 201W – Multimedia Journalism
Section:
1
Instructor:
Donna McDermott
Meets: TuTh 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description:
Students write and report for newspapers, radio, magazines, online sites, and social media and develop websites to publish multimedia writing and news reports. They learn the basics of news writing and reporting, interviewing, and audio and video production. No journalism background required.

Course: ENGRD 202 - Multiliteracy Tutor Practicum
Section:
1
Instructor:
Melissa Yang & Levin Arnsperger
Meets: F 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description:
This practicum course is designed as a companion to first semester experience as a Writing Center tutor. Tutors will have a chance to reflect on their tutoring experiences and discuss tutoring strategies. They will also learn about writing in different disciplines, promoting transfer of skills, and tutoring non-native speakers of English. And they will conduct academic and practical research related to their tutoring work. Contact ahackne@emory.edu for a permission number.

Course: ENGRD 219 - Gateway: Portfolio
Section:
1
Instructor:
David Morgen
Meets: W 11:30 A - 12:20 P
Description:
This course serves as an introduction to the Rhetoric, Writing, and Information Design minor, in which students begin to create the writing portfolio that will be developed in more advanced courses across the minor.

Course: ENGRD 220W – Rhetorical Studies
Section:
1
Instructor:
Joonna Trapp
Meets: TuTh 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description: How does advertising work? Why do I react so strongly to one politician while the other one leaves me flat? How come my professor and I seem to never understand each other? Why is there such controversy over a particular issue? These questions are all questions which bring you into the realm of rhetoric. This class will give you a good basic understanding of rhetoric and why it matters in your life—both in thinking and acting.

This course is a trip. We’ll travel back in time and across a good deal of geographical space to Ancient Greece and Rome, where democracy begat rhetoric (at least in one version of the story). By seeing rhetoric then, we’ll gain a clearer vision of what it might become in our own lives and time. New perspectives and new language picked up on the journey will help us to become savvy about our own attempts, within our own rhetorical situations, to inform, impress, persuade, and enact purposes and values. We should also become better able to imagine what sort of person we need to become to have such influence— what skills to hone, what knowledge to gain, what thought processes to acquire as habits, and what kind of character to form. We’ll talk about Greece, pop culture, advertising, drama, and you’ll get lots of practice in thinking about persuasion and its role in culture. Textbooks will be provided by the professor.

Course: ENGRD 221RW - Advanced Writing Workshop - ELL
Section:
1
Topic:
Race, Language, and Culture
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: TuTh 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description:
In this course, we will discuss how race, language, and culture affect our communication. Immigrant people often face preconceived notions about their language proficiency because of how they use language and how they racially and ethnically look. Ethnic accent bullying and linguistic stereotyping are two common dimensions of linguicism, which refers to beliefs or ideologies that discriminate against human beings based on language. In this course, we will read a variety of texts, stories, and articles written by writers from diverse cultures to discuss racial equalities, identities, forms of justice and injustice, bias and oppression, and human rights. Through a variety of tasks and assignments, students will have the opportunity to improve their writing and communication skills.

Course: ENGRD 221RW - Advanced Writing Workshop
Section:
2
Topic:
Inquiry and the Craft of Argument
Instructor:
Greg Palermo
Meets: TuTh 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description:
Inquiry and the Craft of Argument is a research and writing process course designed to increase your proficiency in critical reading, analysis, academic research, and argumentation—skills necessary for advanced work in every discipline. A central goal of the course is to provide students with the time and opportunity to develop the processes and strategies that characterize confident and successful researchers and writers. Course activities and assignments will allow for practice in critical reading and the research and writing process that will help students claim authority as a writer and thinker. This course is designed to build upon ENGRD 101 or earlier experiences in writing instruction by delving more deeply into the craft of arguing.

Students will formulate research inquiries of their own and pursue them through a systematic and sustained research and writing process. Rewriting, rethinking, and revising will be encouraged throughout the semester as they develop their own ways of thinking and authority about an inquiry of their own design.  Each major course assignment will ask you to present your evolving thinking using a different modality (mode of presentation). Some of these modalities will look familiar (e.g., “a paper”) and others will challenge you to think more creatively and expansively about the presentation of research and argument. Ultimately, the course provides you with the opportunity to develop the skills and strategies you need for success in your upper division research and writing challenges, as well as your professional, community, and civic lives.

Course: ENGRD 223 – Rhetorical Grammar
Section:
1
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: Does not meet. This is an online asynchronous class.
Description: Through a study and analysis of grammar's impact on rhetorical effectiveness, students work with their own writing as they learn to make and adapt grammatical choices to fit audience, purpose, constraints, exigencies, and timing. The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. However, Grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader.

Course: ENGRD 223 – Rhetorical Grammar
Section:
2
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: Does not meet. This is an online asynchronous class.
Description: Through a study and analysis of grammar's impact on rhetorical effectiveness, students work with their own writing as they learn to make and adapt grammatical choices to fit audience, purpose, constraints, exigencies, and timing. The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. However, Grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader.

Course: ENGRD 223 – Rhetorical Grammar
Section:
3
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: Does not meet. This is an online asynchronous class.
Description: Through a study and analysis of grammar's impact on rhetorical effectiveness, students work with their own writing as they learn to make and adapt grammatical choices to fit audience, purpose, constraints, exigencies, and timing. The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. However, Grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader.

Course: ENGRD 223 – Rhetorical Grammar
Section:
4
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: Does not meet. This is an online asynchronous class.
Description: Through a study and analysis of grammar's impact on rhetorical effectiveness, students work with their own writing as they learn to make and adapt grammatical choices to fit audience, purpose, constraints, exigencies, and timing. The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. However, Grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader.

Course: ENGRD 230W – Professional Writing
Section:
1
Instructor:
Melissa Yang
Meets: TuTh 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description: In this writing-intensive and participation-driven course, we will collaboratively examine the contexts for and rhetorical dimensions of diverse professional documents—primarily, those you will produce this term. Major assignments include career materials (resume, cover letter, and/or personal statements), a research report analyzing workplace writing, and a project presenting a professional passion in multimodal form (podcast, video, infographic, etc.). Through practice and discussion, we will explore the nature of professionalism and strategies for producing ethical, effective, and efficient professional writing.

Course: ENGRD 302W – Technical Writing
Section: 1
Instructor:
Ben Miller
Meets: MW 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description: Technical Writing for Data Science - This writing-intensive course provides students with practice developing effective and ethically sensitive communication in genres that characterize professional activity across and outside the university with a focus on technical and quantitative information. No prior technical knowledge is required.

Students should complete one of the following forms for an enrollment permission number:

QTM 302W (only QTM majors/minors) https://forms.office.com/r/PcFf57Fkc8

ENGRD 302W (only non-QTM majors/minors) https://forms.office.com/r/rPvjmGvzE2


Course:
ENGRD 302W – Technical Writing
Section: 2
Instructor:
Ben Miller
Meets: MW 8:30 A - 9:45 A
Description: Technical Writing for Data Science - This writing-intensive course provides students with practice developing effective and ethically sensitive communication in genres that characterize professional activity across and outside the university with a focus on technical and quantitative information. No prior technical knowledge is required.

Students should complete one of the following forms for an enrollment permission number:

QTM 302W (only QTM majors/minors) https://forms.office.com/r/PcFf57Fkc8

ENGRD 302W (only non-QTM majors/minors) https://forms.office.com/r/rPvjmGvzE2


Course:
ENGRD 302W – Technical Writing
Section: 3
Instructor:
Greg Palermo
Meets: TuTh 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description: Technical Writing for Data Science - This writing-intensive course provides students with practice developing effective and ethically sensitive communication in genres that characterize professional activity across and outside the university with a focus on technical and quantitative information. No prior technical knowledge is required.

Students should complete one of the following forms for an enrollment permission number:

QTM 302W (only QTM majors/minors) https://forms.office.com/r/PcFf57Fkc8

ENGRD 302W (only non-QTM majors/minors) https://forms.office.com/r/rPvjmGvzE2

Course: ENGRD 328W – Race, Gender, Media Making
Section: 1
Instructor:
Ruixue Zhang
Meets: MW 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description: “From what political perspective do we dream, look, create, and take action?” asked bell hooks in her 1992 book Black Looks. Three decades later, Cathy Park Hong in Minor Feelings furthers the question: “Who am I writing for?” Both writers raise important questions for us: how do we represent ourselves and “others” through various media forms? How do words, images, and sounds inform, reform, or de-form identity and community? In this course, we are going to find the answers through closely reading discourses across genres on the intersections of gender and race in media representations. Students are expected to write an autoethnographic narrative and conduct a research project on media making of cultural identities. Through close reading and critical writing, we hope to seek ways to diversify our perspectives and, as bell hooks says, “create a context of transformation” for our media-saturated society.

Course: ENGRD 349W – Writing for Publication
Section: 1
Instructor:
Robert Birdwell
Meets: MW 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description: Hands-on exploration of the editorial and publication process shaping different fields, genres and venues.  Focus on mechanics of publication, various forums and opportunities for publication germane to student work in different disciplines, and professional opportunities in non-fiction publishing.

Course: ENGRD 380W – Topics in Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy
Section: 1
Instructor:
Christopher Merwin
Meets: TuTh 2:30 P - 3:45 P
Description: This upper division environmental writing and ethics course invites students to think through and advocate for different approaches to the environment. Composed of four main modules, this course begins with our normative concepts of nature, starting with the ancient Greeks and Romans, as well as early Chinese and Japanese concepts of nature. We then move to more contemporary approaches via American indigenous views, eco-feminist, and eco-phenomenological, in order offer theories of nature which are better suited to dealing with our current environmental crisis. Major assignments for this course are oriented around the idea of “public philosophy” and include several op-eds, a long research paper, and a group podcast.