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Upcoming Classes


Spring 2022 Class Descriptions

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
1
Topic:
Composing Place: Imagination and Perception
Instructor:
Francis Ittenbach
Meets: MWF 8:30 A - 9:20 A
Description:
Joan Didion once wrote that “a place belongs forever to whoever claims it hardest, remembers it most obsessively, wrenches it from itself, shapes it, renders it, loves it so radically that he remakes it in his own image.” How do the ways we think about place(s) – both physical and imaginary – shape our perceptions of the world? How do our own experiences and beliefs affect how we identify with particular locations? This course will develop students' writing skills through examining how the spaces we dwell in, pass through, and even imagine influence our daily lives. Through course texts in philosophy, memoir, journalism, poetry, and film, students will learn to approach writing as a process, critiquing their own and others’ work and adapting genre and style to appropriate rhetorical situations. Students will engage with texts by artists and writers such as Joan Didion, Gaston Bachelard, Hayao Miyazaki, Alice Oswald, Jimmy Santiago Baca, and Daljit Nagra (among others). In drawing on these creators’ methods of evoking places both physical and immaterial, students will compose pieces in a variety of genres including personal essay and research article, along with a final portfolio and reflection on the development of their own writing process.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
2
Topic:
Resisting [,] Retelling: Learning the Power of Reshaping Existing Narratives
Instructor:
Jareema Hylton
Meets: MW 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description:
In this course, we will critically read texts that respond to and attempt to reshape dominant cultural narratives. We will analyze literary appropriations of classic texts, as well as critical written and audio commentaries on the literary canon and cultural gatekeepers. What techniques do writers deploy to productively redirect conversations? Why and how do they reimagine key themes or scenes from the 'original' narratives? Our readings will extend from the colonial period to the contemporary moment and cover a range of genres, including letters, plays, poems, essays, and digital news articles. Potential authors include William Shakespeare, T.S. Eliot, Toni Morrison, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and others who will help us understand and develop argumentative and revision strategies in our writing process. We will evaluate genre conventions, purpose, and implications behind revisionary writers’ additions and omissions as negotiations of authority. Building toward compiling a final portfolio, students will produce a literacy narrative, a research project, and a playlist to practice close reading skills and to shape recognition of audience.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
3
Topic:
Activism: Argument, Art, and Affect
Instructor:
Kathleen Leuschen  
Meets: MWF 1:00 P - 1:50 P
Description:
The position of the writer is one much like a doorway; writers are the conduits between the discourses and demands of the outside world and the dreams and logic of one's own inner landscape. Author Ta-Nehisi Coates describes the act of writing as "the art of thinking" which surpasses the mere transcription of words, sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. Writing, as Coates explains, can be and often "is a confrontation with [one's] own innocence, [one's] own rationalizations." In this expository writing class, students will learn to embody writing as a personal 'art of thinking' space. Students will write to explore concepts like genre, rhetoric, revision, academic discourse, and critical thinking, while further developing and honing their own methods and styles of writing. Students will achieve this through a thematic exploration of the argument, art, and affect of historic and contemporary activism in the United States.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
4
Topic:
Detecting Crime in All its Phases: First Year Writing Investigators
Instructor:
Kareem Joseph
Meets: TuTh 8:30 A - 9:45 A
Description:
In this class, we will analyze, critique and interpret crime as a concept and construct. Put differently, we will learn how crime has been largely constructed and circulated as a socio-political tool, in order to inform our own writing practice. We will engage a variety of genres and forms of writing: social media posts, news reports, interviews, and documentaries to explore different rhetorical approaches to writing about crime, while foregrounding a multimodal approach to investigating crime, and its prevalence, across different mediums. We will ask the following questions throughout the semester: What is crime? What is the relationship between race and crime? How is crime circulated as a socio-political tool? And how has can we use the concepts of rhetoric and composition to deconstruct crime as currently understood by popular culture? We will also explore existing representations of crime across genres in order to learn what is a discourse community and how to strategically write within it. As we read and write within these genres, we will work to identifying why writers utilize different genres to advance certain arguments regarding crime. Such an approach will get us beyond a surface level engagement of crime and into emphasizing the metacognitive and rhetorical elements that are foundational to particular genres and forms, such that we can begin to recognize that thinking about writing is just as integral to writing itself. 

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
5
Topic:
Identity: Experiences with Reading, Writing, and Language
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: TuTh 8:30 A - 9:45 A (online)
Description:
How and why we write, what we think about writing, and how we make sense of texts are impacted by all that we have done and experienced. Our experiences with writing and language are part of our identity. People who have experienced dominant culture can often have very positive literacy experiences. However, if people come from immigrant families, they may start school without dominant literacy experiences. Prior experiences with writing create our attitudes and feelings about writing. In this writing course, we will explore how the accumulation of our experiences with reading, writing, and language can impact what we think about writing and how we feel about ourselves as writers. This course is designed to give you opportunities to practice writing, reading, critical thinking, and visual analysis. In this course, we will read a variety of texts written by writers from both dominant and nondominant cultures to understand rhetorical approaches and writers’ unique experiences. By the end of the course, students will complete personal narrative essay, research writing, multimodal project, and portfolio reflection letter.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
6
Topic:
Identity: Experiences with Reading, Writing, and Language
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: TuTh 10:00 A - 11:15 A (online)
Description:
How and why we write, what we think about writing, and how we make sense of texts are impacted by all that we have done and experienced. Our experiences with writing and language are part of our identity. People who have experienced dominant culture can often have very positive literacy experiences. However, if people come from immigrant families, they may start school without dominant literacy experiences. Prior experiences with writing create our attitudes and feelings about writing. In this writing course, we will explore how the accumulation of our experiences with reading, writing, and language can impact what we think about writing and how we feel about ourselves as writers. This course is designed to give you opportunities to practice writing, reading, critical thinking, and visual analysis. In this course, we will read a variety of texts written by writers from both dominant and nondominant cultures to understand rhetorical approaches and writers’ unique experiences. By the end of the course, students will complete personal narrative essay, research writing, multimodal project, and portfolio reflection letter. 

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
7
Topic:
Digital Black Feminisms
Instructor:
Ariel Lawrence
Meets: TuTh 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
In the past 20 years, Black Feminists have created thriving communities across the internet. We will explore the critical and complex online world of Black Feminism through social media, YouTube, and blog/magazine writing. Students will read foundational Black Feminist texts from authors like Audre Lorde, Alice Walker, and more alongside more recent scholars and writers like Brittany Cooper, Roxanne Gay, and Tressie McMillan Cottom. Students will read and respond weekly and ultimately construct a revised portfolio of their work.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
8
Topic:
Queer Intimacies Around the World
Instructor:
Rohit Chakaborty
Meets: TuTh 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description:
Queer intimacies have been written about, painted, performed on film, and photographed for decades. Museums and libraries, including Emory’s, are gradually incorporating their own wings of LGBTQ archives where you can access narratives of queer activism and living. As the years roll on, visibility of and discussion around queer lives are becoming more prominent. This course is designed to help you participate in the discussion.

This course will offer texts in multiple modes (art, photography, literature, cinema, archival materials) to hone your skills of observation and analysis. It is aimed, first and foremost, at developing your reading and writing skills, and refining your techniques of criticism -- of your own work and those of others'. By engaging with work composed in multiple modes, you will encounter different kinds of “texts,” not just the written word. And, you will respond accordingly, by learning how to write in different genres. Across this semester, you will have assignments due before class, three major assignments, and a final portfolio & reflection letter that you will turn in at the end of the term.

Some materials we will be studying in this course include the following: paintings by Sola Olulode, Louis Fratino, et al, Sunil Gupta’s photographs, Andrea Lawlor’s Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl, films by Akosua Adoma Owusu and Tammy Rae Carland, and archives at the Rose.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
9
Topic:
Disease and Discourse
Instructor:
Ruixue Zhang
Meets: TuTh 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description:
In the time of COVID-19, what can writing do for us? How do various representations of disease across genres and media inform or even change our understanding of humanity and society in an age of anxiety? In this course, we’re going to closely examine different works across genres and think about the two essential questions: how do diseases (or “dis-ease”) become metaphors in our social and cultural discourses about race, gender, sexuality, class, and other living species? How is humanity redefined through literal and metaphorical diseases? Students are expected to conduct a comparative analysis of texts about disease, write a research article on disease discourses across cultures and history, adapt the research paper into a multimodal project combining words with images or sounds, and generate a final portfolio. Through close reading and critical writing, we will explore how diseases in different historical and cultural contexts are used as metaphors for political, social, and psychological problems, and how humanity survives, triumphs over, or fails to rise above individual and social crises. 

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
10
Topic:
Disease and Discourse
Instructor:
Ruixue Zhang
Meets: TuTh 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description:
In the time of COVID-19, what can writing do for us? How do various representations of disease across genres and media inform or even change our understanding of humanity and society in an age of anxiety? In this course, we’re going to closely examine different works across genres and think about the two essential questions: how do diseases (or “dis-ease”) become metaphors in our social and cultural discourses about race, gender, sexuality, class, and other living species? How is humanity redefined through literal and metaphorical diseases? Students are expected to conduct a comparative analysis of texts about disease, write a research article on disease discourses across cultures and history, adapt the research paper into a multimodal project combining words with images or sounds, and generate a final portfolio. Through close reading and critical writing, we will explore how diseases in different historical and cultural contexts are used as metaphors for political, social, and psychological problems, and how humanity survives, triumphs over, or fails to rise above individual and social crises. 

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
11
Topic:
Naming Nature
Instructor:
Melissa Yang
Meets: TuTh 2:30 P - 3:45 P (online)
Description:
This rhetorical composition course explores how language is used to culturally construct the natural world. Course materials will include nature writing, science journalism, environmental humanities scholarship, and more. Assignments include critical and creative projects drawn from inquiry and research, and reflections. Students will have ample opportunity to research and write about the environmental topics they are curious and passionate about.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
12
Topic:
Nature & Environmental Writing
Instructor:
Christopher Merwin
Meets: TuTh 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description:
This intensive writing course focuses on nature and environmental writing with readings from (mostly) American nature writers and conservationists, contemporary academic articles, and public policy about the environment. We'll focus on thinking about environment philosophically, through Native American writers like Luther Standing Bear and Black Elk, along with American transcendentalists like Emerson and Thoreau, conservationists Aldo Leopold and Nan Shepherd, and the impact of environmental policy on peoples of color, all the while translating our writings into environmental ethics, advocacy, and activism. Throughout the course we will hone our writing skills through multimodal reflections on/in nature and environmentally focused papers, narratives, and projects.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
13
Topic:
Nature & Environmental Writing
Instructor:
Christopher Merwin
Meets: 5:30 P - 6:45 P
Description:
This intensive writing course focuses on nature and environmental writing with readings from (mostly) American nature writers and conservationists, contemporary academic articles, and public policy about the environment. We'll focus on thinking about environment philosophically, through Native American writers like Luther Standing Bear and Black Elk, along with American transcendentalists like Emerson and Thoreau, conservationists Aldo Leopold and Nan Shepherd, and the impact of environmental policy on peoples of color, all the while translating our writings into environmental ethics, advocacy, and activism. Throughout the course we will hone our writing skills through multimodal reflections on/in nature and environmentally focused papers, narratives, and projects.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
14
Topic:
Food Writing
Instructor:
Mitchell Murray
Meets: MW 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
When we eat and communicate about food, we learn more about our social and cultural selves. Food connects us and bridges cultures. But it also divides and hierarchizes. Food has been at the center of colonial conquest, and many cuisines we now celebrate were invented by necessity by the poor, working-class, and enslaved. When we eat, we also participate in these legacies of violence and expropriation. Yet, at the same time, cooking and eating are acts of creativity and community-building. In this course, students will grapple with the fraught histories of food while entering the world of food writing.

We will focus on questions like: What does food tell us about consumerism? What can delicacies like nutmeg or matsutake tell us about capitalism and colonialism? What does foodie culture have to do with white supremacy? What are consequences of culinary industrialization? How does climate change affect food production and culture? Can we eat ethically and sustainably in an unethical and unsustainable system? Can we build the political will to feed everyone on Earth? Finally, we'll take advantage of Emory’s location as we explore how food has lately shaped the southern foodie city of Atlanta.

Readings will include historical and contemporary cookery, food journalism, foodoirs, TV, and digital media. Assignments may include rhetorical analyses of cookbooks, reviews, collaboratively creating a cooking channel—and yes, actual cooking.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
15
Topic:
Food Writing
Instructor:
Mitchell Murray
Meets: MW 2:30 P - 3:45 P
Description:
When we eat and communicate about food, we learn more about our social and cultural selves. Food connects us and bridges cultures. But it also divides and hierarchizes. Food has been at the center of colonial conquest, and many cuisines we now celebrate were invented by necessity by the poor, working-class, and enslaved. When we eat, we also participate in these legacies of violence and expropriation. Yet, at the same time, cooking and eating are acts of creativity and community-building. In this course, students will grapple with the fraught histories of food while entering the world of food writing.

We will focus on questions like: What does food tell us about consumerism? What can delicacies like nutmeg or matsutake tell us about capitalism and colonialism? What does foodie culture have to do with white supremacy? What are consequences of culinary industrialization? How does climate change affect food production and culture? Can we eat ethically and sustainably in an unethical and unsustainable system? Can we build the political will to feed everyone on Earth? Finally, we'll take advantage of Emory’s location as we explore how food has lately shaped the southern foodie city of Atlanta.

Readings will include historical and contemporary cookery, food journalism, foodoirs, TV, and digital media. Assignments may include rhetorical analyses of cookbooks, reviews, collaboratively creating a cooking channel—and yes, actual cooking.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
16
Topic:
Food Writing
Instructor:
Mitchell Murray
Meets: MW 5:30 P - 6:45 P
Description:
When we eat and communicate about food, we learn more about our social and cultural selves. Food connects us and bridges cultures. But it also divides and hierarchizes. Food has been at the center of colonial conquest, and many cuisines we now celebrate were invented by necessity by the poor, working-class, and enslaved. When we eat, we also participate in these legacies of violence and expropriation. Yet, at the same time, cooking and eating are acts of creativity and community-building. In this course, students will grapple with the fraught histories of food while entering the world of food writing.

We will focus on questions like: What does food tell us about consumerism? What can delicacies like nutmeg or matsutake tell us about capitalism and colonialism? What does foodie culture have to do with white supremacy? What are consequences of culinary industrialization? How does climate change affect food production and culture? Can we eat ethically and sustainably in an unethical and unsustainable system? Can we build the political will to feed everyone on Earth? Finally, we'll take advantage of Emory’s location as we explore how food has lately shaped the southern foodie city of Atlanta.

Readings will include historical and contemporary cookery, food journalism, foodoirs, TV, and digital media. Assignments may include rhetorical analyses of cookbooks, reviews, collaboratively creating a cooking channel—and yes, actual cooking.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
17
Topic:
Ethnography: Interrogating Culture through Writing
Instructor:
Sean Dolan
Meets: MW 1:00 P - 2:15 P
Description:
Ethnography is a type of research writing that focuses on social life. Its primary focus is cultural diversity. In this course, we will explore ethnography as an approach to writing applicable to different rhetorical aims and fields of research. In addition to analyzing examples of ethnography, students will conduct ethnographic projects by writing about social and cultural events in Atlanta.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
18
Topic:
Ethnography: Interrogating Culture through Writing
Instructor:
Sean Dolan
Meets: MW 2:30 P - 3:45 P
Description:
Ethnography is a type of research writing that focuses on social life. Its primary focus is cultural diversity. In this course, we will explore ethnography as an approach to writing applicable to different rhetorical aims and fields of research. In addition to analyzing examples of ethnography, students will conduct ethnographic projects by writing about social and cultural events in Atlanta.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
19
Topic:
Ethnography: Interrogating Culture through Writing
Instructor:
Sean Dolan
Meets: MW 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description:
Ethnography is a type of research writing that focuses on social life. Its primary focus is cultural diversity. In this course, we will explore ethnography as an approach to writing applicable to different rhetorical aims and fields of research. In addition to analyzing examples of ethnography, students will conduct ethnographic projects by writing about social and cultural events in Atlanta.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section:
20
Topic:
Visual Narratives
Instructor:
Telsa Cariani
Meets: MW 5:30 P - 6:45 P
Description:
In an increasingly visual world, interacting with texts and images is an integral part of everyday life. This composition course explores how comics, graphic novels, and other visual narratives leverage pictorial and semantic elements to convey meaning. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which sexuality, gender, race, and other categories of difference are communicated visually.

You will engage with the course theme through assignments designed to develop your critical thinking and analytic skills. We will begin by reading a few chapters from Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art to give us a framework for approaching graphic texts. We will then turn our attention to graphic novels like Spinning by Tillie Walden. After analyzing graphic texts, you will have a chance to construct your own visual argument (no prior artistic experience necessary). Assignments include: essays, discussion posts, presentations, a digital project, and a final portfolio.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section: 21
Topic: Argument and Global Audiences 
Instructor: Olivia Hendricks
Meets: TuTh 4:00 P - 5:15 P
Description: In recognition of the broadening range of audiences that communication technologies allow (some) writers to address directly, we will analyze arguments by writers from throughout the world, such as Argentine cultural critic Beatriz Sarlo, Nigerian public intellectual Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Malaysian politician Lim Keng Yaik.

In turn, you will develop your own theory for how to ethically approach processes such as research, critical thinking, revision, and reflection when crafting writing that will cross borders.

As a portion of the course, you will use research and writing as learning tools to enhance your current events knowledge and cultural competencies related to a country context of your choosing.

Writing assignments will emphasize genres that writers often use to address audiences across country contexts. These may include: a research-based op ed, a grant or policy proposal, a cultural criticism essay, and a TED Talk, among other possibilities.

 

Course: ENGRD 101 - Rhetorical Comp/Critical Reading
Section: 22
Topic: Christopher Merwin
Meets: TuTh 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description: This intensive writing course focuses on nature and environmental writing with readings from (mostly) American nature writers and conservationists, contemporary academic articles, and public policy about the environment. We'll focus on thinking about the environment philosophically, through Native American writers like Luther Standing Bear and Black Elk, along with American transcendentalists like Emerson and Thoreau, conservationists Aldo Leopold and Nan Shepherd, and the impact of environmental policy on peoples of color, all the while translating our writings into environmental ethics, advocacy, and activism. Throughout the course we will hone our writing skills through multimodal reflections on/in nature and environmentally focused papers, narratives, and projects.

Course: ENGRD 123R - Communicative Grammar
Section:
1
Instructor:
Jane O’Connor
Meets: W 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
ENGRD 123R is an intensive grammar course designed specifically to prepare students for whom English is an additional language for the communicative expectations and challenges they may encounter over the course their academic careers. This course will focus on researching, analyzing and practicing English grammar in order to develop students' knowledge of form, meaning and usage, while providing continuous and responsive feedback. Through a variety of activities and texts we will study, practice and refine grammatical accuracy for the purpose of expressing clear and precise meanings. At times I will use lecture and focused activities to introduce specific grammar points that are important for additional language learners; in other lessons, students will discover the nuances of grammar usage by reading texts or using corpus linguistics; additionally, students will have ample opportunity to practice and apply what they have learned to revise and refine their own academic writing. We will look at both more serious global concerns that can affect a reader's general comprehension of the work (such as verb tense) and less serious local concerns that can result in an impreciseness of meaning (such as verb form). What are the choices we make as we construct meaning and how can different choices affect meaning?

Enrollment by permission only from Jane O'Connor. Class to be taken with ENGRD 101. Other students may request the class.

 

Course: ENGRD 123R - Communicative Grammar
Section:
2
Instructor:
Jane O’Connor
Meets: Asynchronous online instruction only; class does not meet
Description:
ENGRD 123R is an intensive grammar course designed specifically to prepare students for whom English is an additional language for the communicative expectations and challenges they may encounter over the course their academic careers. This course will focus on researching, analyzing and practicing English grammar in order to develop students' knowledge of form, meaning and usage, while providing continuous and responsive feedback. Through a variety of activities and texts we will study, practice and refine grammatical accuracy for the purpose of expressing clear and precise meanings. At times I will use lecture and focused activities to introduce specific grammar points that are important for additional language learners; in other lessons, students will discover the nuances of grammar usage by reading texts or using corpus linguistics; additionally, students will have ample opportunity to practice and apply what they have learned to revise and refine their own academic writing. We will look at both more serious global concerns that can affect a reader's general comprehension of the work (such as verb tense) and less serious local concerns that can result in an impreciseness of meaning (such as verb form). What are the choices we make as we construct meaning and how can different choices affect meaning?

Enrollment by permission only from Jane O'Connor. Class to be taken with ENGRD 101. Other students may request the class.

Course: ENGRD 219 - Gateway: Portfolio
Section:
1
Instructor:
David Morgen
Meets: Th 1:00 P - 2:00 P
Description:
This course serves as an introduction to the Rhetoric, Writing, and Information Design minor, in which students begin to create the writing portfolio that will be developed in more advanced courses across the minor.

Course: ENGRD 221RW ELL - Advanced Writing Workshop
Section:
1
Topic: Communication Across Borders
Instructor:
Levin Arnsperger
Meets: TuTh 10:00 A - 11:15 A
Description:
In this continuing writing course for English language learners, we will discuss key aspects of translation and cross-cultural communication. What happens when we translate arguments and ideas across countries and cultures? How do people of different backgrounds communicate with each other? What makes these interactions effective or ineffective? We will talk about what might be gained and lost in moments of cross-cultural and/or transnational communication, and we will address responsibilities and opportunities for the individuals and groups engaging in communicative endeavors. We will read/listen/watch different relevant materials that encourage students to reflect on these issues and themes. Through a variety of tasks and assignments, students will have the chance to improve their own writing and communication skills. 

 

Course: ENGRD 223 - Rhetorical Grammar
Section:
1
Instructor:
Christopher Merwin
Meets: Asynchronous online instruction only; class does not meet
Description:
Through a study and analysis of grammar's impact on rhetorical effectiveness, students work with their own writing as they learn to make and adapt grammatical choices to fit audience, purpose, constraints, exigencies, and timing. The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. In reality, grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader.

Enrollment by permission only from Joonna Trapp.

 

Course: ENGRD 223 - Rhetorical Grammar
Section:
3
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: Asynchronous online instruction only; class does not meet
Description:
Through a study and analysis of grammar's impact on rhetorical effectiveness, students work with their own writing as they learn to make and adapt grammatical choices to fit audience, purpose, constraints, exigencies, and timing. The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. However, Grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader.

Enrollment by permission only from Joonna Trapp.

 

Course: ENGRD 223 - Rhetorical Grammar
Section:
4
Instructor:
Mahmuda Sharmin
Meets: Asynchronous online instruction only; class does not meet
Description:
Through a study and analysis of grammar's impact on rhetorical effectiveness, students work with their own writing as they learn to make and adapt grammatical choices to fit audience, purpose, constraints, exigencies, and timing. The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. However, Grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader.

Enrollment by permission only from Joonna Trapp.

Course: ENGRD 302W - Technical Writing
Section:
1
Instructor:
Benjamin Miller
Meets: TuTh 11:30 A - 12:45 P
Description:
Technical Writing for Data Science - This writing-intensive course provides students with practice developing effective and ethically sensitive communication in genres that characterize professional activity across and outside the university with a focus on technical and quantitative information. No prior technical knowledge is required.

Students should complete one of the following forms for an enrollment permission number:

QTM 302W (only QTM majors/minors): https://forms.office.com/r/UhnG2BB437

ENGRD 302W (only non-QTM majors/minors): https://forms.office.com/r/iJE62N6t2i

Course: ENGRD 316W - Literacy & the Rhetorics of Resistance
Section:
1
Instructor:
Kathleen Leuschen
Meets: MW 2:30 P - 3:45 P
Description:
History is rife with prohibitions and laws that prevented groups of people from full access to the practices of reading and writing. Consider this, why were African slaves forbidden to learn to read and write? Why did Victorian doctors link women's reading to physical maladies? This continuing writing class investigates literacy practices as rhetorical endeavors of resistance to power structures that attempted to control and deprive certain populations from the pleasure and agency of meaning-making.

Course: ENGRD 380W - Topics in Writing, Rhetoric, and Literacy
Section:
1
Topic: The Rhetoric of Misinformation
Instructors:
Sarah Morris, Sarah Harsh, and Christopher Merwin
Meets: TuTh 2:30 P - 3:45 P
Description:
Misinformation is a complex and challenging facet of our current information and media ecosystems. Misinformation is, essentially, information that is incorrect, false, or misleading. But part of the complexity of misinformation stems from the many forms it can take. Misinformation can be intentional or unintentional, can appear in social media posts or full-scale campaigns aimed at obfuscation. In the 21st century, misinformation has adopted new forms and poses new challenges. This course will explore the rhetorical forms and features of misinformation in order to provide deeper insight into what misinformation is, how it functions, and how we can overcome it.

In this course we will unpack the media and information ecosystems that shape the forms of misinformation that we currently see, delve into the rhetorical trends, forms, and features of misinformation, and develop information and media literacy skills to better recognize and overcome misinformation. This course is organized in three distinct modules. In the first module we will look at the rhetoric of misinformation and evaluate how language is used to manipulate audiences. In the second module, we zoom out to understand how that rhetoric serves and is propagated in information ecosystems. Finally, in module three we look at the relationship between propaganda and truth. Assignments include regular reflections, analysis papers, and a multimodal final project which teaches and empowers regarding misinformation.