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Upcoming Classes


Fall 2020 Class Descriptions

Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 1
Topic: Passports and Checkpoints
Instructor: Ra’Niqua Lee
Meets: W 08:00 – 09:15 online
Description: This course will explore topics of mobility and access. Students will examine the roles that travel narratives, blogs, and other media play in reifying typical constructions of space and place. Our conversations will center the production of space in these mediums. Student writing will explore what these productions reveal about how we value, or fail to value, diverse lives. Students will maintain a blog and complete a final research project.


Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 2
Topic: Global Translation: Rhetoric in the Age of #s and @s
Instructor: Karlie Rodriguez
Meets: M 11:20 – 12:35 online
Description: This course centers on influencer culture and online mobilization (be it political, artistic, philanthropic, or even self-promoting). The goal here is to identify and trace the trajectory of revolutionary #Ideas across time and space to better understand how they move, transform, and inspire new ideas and worldviews around the globe. We will engage in comparative analyses of big ideas that have impacted the world, pinpoint their place of origin, identify the historical moment they are embedded in, and attempt to understand the ways in which these ideas—which at times may be in dialectical tension with each other (i.e. ideas that are generally understood to be opposing forces)—converge, and even engage in dialogue once they intersect online. Simultaneous to understanding where, when, how and why ideas are produced and distributed, you will be conceptualizing, historicizing, and theorizing your own. Ideas always matter but they can only do something if they become externalized and mobilized in some form. Thus, this course is not only reading and thinking intensive, but also writing intensive.

In this course, we will cover diverse movements that have begun online but have had material consequences in the “real” world, such as #BlackLivesMatter, #MeToo, #OwnVoice, and #RickyRenuncia. The goal of this course is to make you think about the kind of influence and impact you could have in the world with the mere click of a button, question whether this influence is ethical or not, and help you decide if it even is enough to produce enduring change. You will also read #Scholarship, #Poetry, and a variety of #Manifestos with the final goal of conceptualizing your own movement. Ultimately, this course hopes to inspire you to #Read, #Think, #Write, and maybe #Share.


Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
3
Topic: 
The Millennial Genre: The Pains, Pleasures, and Particulars of Social Media
Instructor: 
Alexis Mayfield
Meets: 
Tu 11:20 – 12:35 online
Description:
From activism and advertising— to the dreaded threat of “cancellation”—social media has morphed many familiar genres into hybrid forms that follow old conventions while establishing new rules. Using texts like Dr. King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” students will track the evolution of open letters and memoirs as genres that take new shape on social media. Students will complete scaffolded assignments and take a critical eye to the famous, the infamous, and even themselves to examine the ways genres and narratives are changing at the speed of a tweet.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section:
 4
Topic: 
Language and Violence
Instructor: 
Brenton Boyd
Meets: 
Th 13:00 – 14:15 online
Description: While English literacy yields greater social capital in the modern world, the forces that led to its dominance should be contemplated by all speakers. This course surveys the English language's roots in colonialism, racism, warfare, and epistemic violence. Tasked to suspend presumptions about communication, students will encounter various modes of thinking and writing about language/violence while practicing effective argumentation and curating academic blogs. The act of writing, we will observe, can perpetuate violence or defy the ‘powers that be’.


Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section:
 5
Topic: 
Play Make Write Think
Instructor: 
David Morgen
Meets: 
Tu 08:00 – 09:15 online
Description:
In this class, we will play games, read and write about games, discuss games, design games, and create and build our own games. In the process, we willl explore how systems analysis, probability theory, pattern recognition, and procedural rhetoric have become indispensable tools for understanding contemporary culture. The writing you do in this class will include not only words on paper but also oral, visual, electronic, & nonverbal communication. The class will create and publish a podcast series.


Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
8
Topic: 
Writing Home
Instructor: 
Sarah Harsh
Meets: 
Th 13:00 – 14:15 online
Description: 
In this class, we will read and write about the people, places, and things that make us feel at home. In the process, we’ll explore representations of belonging across cultures. Assignments will include regular reading and writing alongside major written and multimodal compositions. Students will practice writing as a process through extensive drafting, revision, and reflection. Completion of this course will make students better writers, thinkers, and communicators.


Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section:
 10
Topic: 
Composing Natural Wonders
Instructor: 
Melissa Yang
Meets: 
M 14:40 – 15:55 online
Description:
This writing-intensive course invites students to develop skills in rhetoric, research, writing, and revision while exploring the environmental humanities. Selected readings on ecological topics will range in genre from historical nature writing to contemporary science journalism and media. Assignments will include critical and creative essays and multimodal projects.


Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section:
 11
Topic: 
Composing Natural Wonders
Instructor: 
Melissa Yang
Meets: 
M 16:20 – 17:35 online
Description:
This writing-intensive course invites students to develop skills in rhetoric, research, writing, and revision while exploring the environmental humanities. Selected readings on ecological topics will range in genre from historical nature writing to contemporary science journalism and media. Assignments will include critical and creative essays and multimodal projects.


Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section:
 12
Topic: 
Ethnography: Interrogating Culture through Writing
Instructor: 
Sean Dolan
Meets: 
W 14:20 – 15:55 online
Description:
Ethnography is a type of research writing based on participation in social life. Its primary focus is cultural diversity. In this course, we will explore ethnography as an approach to writing applicable to different rhetorical aims and a wide range of research fields. In addition to analyzing examples of ethnography, students will also conduct ethnographic projects by writing about social and cultural events in Atlanta.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
13
Topic: 
Ethnography: Interrogating Culture through Writing
Instructor: 
Sean Dolan
Meets: 
W 16:20 – 17:35 online
Description:
Ethnography is a type of research writing based on participation in social life. Its primary focus is cultural diversity. In this course, we will explore ethnography as an approach to writing applicable to different rhetorical aims and a wide range of research fields. In addition to analyzing examples of ethnography, students will also conduct ethnographic projects by writing about social and cultural events in Atlanta.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section:
 14
Topic: 
Ethnography: Interrogating Culture through Writing
Instructor: 
Sean Dolan
Meets: 
W 18:00 – 19:15 online
Description:
Ethnography is a type of research writing based on participation in social life. Its primary focus is cultural diversity. In this course, we will explore ethnography as an approach to writing applicable to different rhetorical aims and a wide range of research fields. In addition to analyzing examples of ethnography, students will also conduct ethnographic projects by writing about social and cultural events in Atlanta.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing with ELL Support
Section: 
17
Topic: 
An Education: Writing College
Instructor: 
Bailey Betik
Meets: M 08:00 – 09:15 online
Description:
You got in! ...So now what? What does it mean to “go to college”? This course asks you to consider representations of higher education in memoir, documentary, & journalism in relation to your own held identities (gender, class, race, etc.). With an emphasis on digital composition, we will explore the idea & aims of college, as well as debate & define what it means to be “educated” through blog reflections, multimodal presentations, and an ethnographic interview partnership with Georgia Tech students.


Course: ENG 101 – Expository Writing with ELL Support
Section:
 18
Topic: 
Stranger Things
Instructor: 
Ishanika Sharma
Meets:
 W 09:40 – 10:55 online
Description:
What do we mean when we say something is “strange?” How too do we conceive of what seems “familiar?” Might something be strange and familiar at the same time? In tackling strangeness, we will critically engage fiction, images, film, essays, etc., and learn to craft our arguments multimodally through presentations, blog posts, essays, and reflections. Even as we encounter and acquaint ourselves with strangeness, we will learn to compose and present our work clearly and compellingly.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing with ELL Support
Section: 
19
Topic: 
Writing Home
Instructor: 
Sarah Harsh
Meets: 
Th 09:40 – 10:55 online
Description:
In this class, we will read and write about the people, places, and things that make us feel at home. In the process, we’ll explore representations of belonging across cultures. Assignments will include regular reading and writing alongside major written and multimodal compositions. Students will practice writing as a process through extensive drafting, revision, and reflection. Completion of this course will make students better writers, thinkers, and communicators.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
20
Topic: 
Being Here: Technology and Attention
Instructor: 
Brandon Wicks
Meets: 
M 09:40 – 10:55 online
Description:
In this section of Expository Writing, we will explore how technologies of convenience and communication shape not only our attention but also our expectations of attention in personal, social, and professional settings. We will apply what we learn to different rhetorical situations and experiment with a wide variety of genres and methods of composition—laptops, phones, visual and audial media—to better understand, firsthand, how these various modes impact us as writers and audiences.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
21
Topic: 
Being Here: Technology and Attention
Instructor: 
Brandon Wicks
Meets: 
M 11:20 – 12:35 online
Description:
In this section of Expository Writing, we will explore how technologies of convenience and communication shape not only our attention but also our expectations of attention in personal, social, and professional settings. We will apply what we learn to different rhetorical situations and experiment with a wide variety of genres and methods of composition—laptops, phones, visual and audial media—to better understand, firsthand, how these various modes impact us as writers and audiences.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
22
Topic: 
Voices: Writing Worlds of Perception
Instructor:
 Chris Merwin
Meets: 
TuTh 13:00 – 14:15 Math & Science N304
Description: 
How do we find ourselves through our writing? How do we perceive the world of others through their writings? How, as philosopher Walter Benjamin suggests, does our writing capture not only our thought, but also our interpersonal, institutional, and eco-social relations? Can we, as philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty believes, use language and writing to learn more about ourselves? This writing-intensive course aims to explore the theme of self-reflection, identity, and (self-)description through selected readings in philosophy, literature, contemporary journalism, poetry, tribal histories,memoires, and academic articles. We will read and respond to a variety of different writers who write in different modalities about themes of race, disability, sovereignty, and colonialism. Throughout the course we will develop and hone our own methods and styles of self-description while interrogating the ethical and social impacts that writing brings to bear.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
23
Topic:
 Voices: Writing Worlds of Perception
Instructor:
 Chris Merwin
Meets: 
TuTh 16:20 – 17:35 Math & Science N304
Description:
How do we find ourselves through our writing? How do we perceive the world of others through their writings? How, as philosopher Walter Benjamin suggests, does our writing capture not only our thought, but also our interpersonal, institutional, and eco-social relations? Can we, as philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty believes, use language and writing to learn more about ourselves? This writing-intensive course aims to explore the theme of self-reflection, identity, and (self-)description through selected readings in philosophy, literature, contemporary journalism, poetry, tribal histories,memoires, and academic articles. We will read and respond to a variety of different writers who write in different modalities about themes of race, disability, sovereignty, and colonialism. Throughout the course we will develop and hone our own methods and styles of self-description while interrogating the ethical and social impacts that writing brings to bear.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
24
Topic: 
Voices: Writing Worlds of Perception
Instructor: 
Chris Merwin
Meets: 
TuTh 18:00 – 19:15 Math & Science N304
Description:
How do we find ourselves through our writing? How do we perceive the world of others through their writings? How, as philosopher Walter Benjamin suggests, does our writing capture not only our thought, but also our interpersonal, institutional, and eco-social relations? Can we, as philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty believes, use language and writing to learn more about ourselves? This writing-intensive course aims to explore the theme of self-reflection, identity, and (self-)description through selected readings in philosophy, literature, contemporary journalism, poetry, tribal histories, memoires, and academic articles. We will read and respond to a variety of different writers who write in different modalities about themes of race, disability, sovereignty, and colonialism. Throughout the course we will develop and hone our own methods and styles of self-description while interrogating the ethical and social impacts that writing brings to bear.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
25
Topic: 
The Politics of Archaeological Heritage
Instructor:
 Laura Heath-Stout
Meets: 
W 08:00 – 09:15 online
Description:
What should happen to Confederate monuments? Why did ISIS destroy the archaeological site of Palmyra? Why is it illegal for archaeologists to dig up Native American bones? What is the artifact on the flag of Zimbabwe? In this course, we will examine the ways archaeological heritage affects and is affected by modern identities, oppression, and politics. Students will choose contested sites or monuments to research and write about in a variety of genres and for a variety of audiences.


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
26
Topic: 
The Politics of Archaeological Heritage
Instructor: 
Laura Heath-Stout
Meets: 
W 11:20 – 12:35 online
Description:
What should happen to Confederate monuments? Why did ISIS destroy the archaeological site of Palmyra? Why is it illegal for archaeologists to dig up Native American bones? What is the artifact on the flag of Zimbabwe? In this course, we will examine the ways archaeological heritage affects and is affected by modern identities, oppression, and politics. Students will choose contested sites or monuments to research and write about in a variety of genres and for a variety of audience


Course:  ENG 101 – Expository Writing
Section: 
27
Topic: 
The Politics of Archaeological Heritage
Instructor: 
Laura Heath-Stout
Meets: 
W 13:00 – 14:15 online
Description:
What should happen to Confederate monuments? Why did ISIS destroy the archaeological site of Palmyra? Why is it illegal for archaeologists to dig up Native American bones? What is the artifact on the flag of Zimbabwe? In this course, we will examine the ways archaeological heritage affects and is affected by modern identities, oppression, and politics. Students will choose contested sites or monuments to research and write about in a variety of genres and for a variety of audiences.

Course:  CPLT 110 – Introduction to Literary Studies
Section: 
1
Topic:
 Breaking (Down) the Racial Contract
Instructor: 
Andrew Kaplan
Meets: 
MW 09:40 – 10:55 online
Description: 
To analyze means to break down, and writing always entails analysis. By engaging the following genres of reading and writing through recursive scaffolding, we will cultivate our ability to break down the constructed (prison of) appearances we inherit from our racialized 'social contract.' In this way, we will learn how re-vision is a way of life that can enable us to question/analyze our inherited assumptions/values and re-envision a more just world. Accordingly, this class will leave you better prepared to critically engage everything from your other classes, to social media, to your future professions, and everyday life. | PARTICULARS: Along with "Participation" (20%) and an "Education Narrative" (5%), our first unit will culminate in a "Rhetorical & Comparative Analysis Essay" (15%) on Freire, Mills, and Plato. Our second unit will culminate in a "Comparative Analysis and Research Essay" (20%) on Wright's non-/fiction. Our third unit will culminate in an "Anthology & Analytic Introduction" (25%) to your writing. And the course will culminate in a "Portfolio & Reflection Letter" (15%) on your semester's writing.


Course:  CPLT 110 – Introduction to Literary Studies
Section: 2
Topic: Reading (Through) Drag: Reading and Writing of Drag
Instructor: Isabelle Meyer-Ensass
Meets: MW 16:20 – 17:35 online
Description: How might a reading of drag performances hone and expand our reading and writing skills? How could drag be understood as a mode of reading, writing, and revision? In this course, we will address these guiding questions by examining how a reading of drag performances can affirm, trouble, and change our very understanding, which is to say reading, of gender itself. We will begin our engagement with a meditation on our own formative experiences of being taught about sexual difference and the ways in which we may or may not have been told to "act according to our gender," which we will recursively connect to the ways in which we have been taught to read and write. This course will invite you to continuously question what you think you know about gender, reading, and writing and aims to provide you with both the tools and the space to creatively refine your reading and writing skills accordingly.

PARTICULARS: The coursework will consist of a portfolio of short written assignments, two essays and one in-class presentation.

Course: ENGRD 123R – Communicative Grammar
Section: 
1
Instructor:
 Jane O’Connor
Online only; does not meet
Description:
English 123R is an intensive grammar course designed specifically to prepare students for whom English is an additional language for the communicative expectations and challenges they may encounter over the course their academic careers. This course will focus on researching, analyzing and practicing English grammar in order to develop students’ knowledge of form, meaning and usage, while providing continuous and responsive feedback. Through a variety of activities and texts we will study, practice and refine grammatical accuracy for the purpose of expressing clear and precise meanings. At times I will use lecture and focused activities to introduce specific grammar points that are important for additional language learners; in other lessons, students will discover the nuances of grammar usage by reading texts or using corpus linguistics; additionally, students will have ample opportunity to practice and apply what they have learned to revise and refine their own academic writing. We will look at both more serious “global” concerns that can affect a reader’s general comprehension of the work (such as verb tense) and less serious “local” concerns that can result in an impreciseness of meaning (such as verb form). What are the choices we make as we construct meaning and how can different choices affect meaning?

Permission only from Jane O'Connor. Class to be taken with English 101. Other students may request the class.

Course: ENG 181 – Writing About Literature
Section:
 1
Topic: 
Queer Literary Histories
Instructor: 
Tyler Tennant
Meets: 
Th 16:20 – 17:35 online
Description: 
By considering various historical/ institutional contexts, this course examines some of the major political issues that shape LGBTQ experience through literary and cultural production. Focusing on 20th/21st century novels, film, music, and theory, we will learn how to closely read and critically engage with the central themes and concepts of “queer literature,” including questions of representation, the social construction of identities, and the “queerness” of a text in form, style, and content.


Course: ENG 181 – Writing About Literature 
Section: 
2
Topic: 
Charon’s Keen Gaze
Instructor: 
Daniel Bosch
Meets: 
TuTh 08:00 – 09:15 White Hall 112
Description: 
The mythological ferryman’s name is drawn from the ancient Greek charopós, “of keen gaze.” But to what, in the dim light of the underworld, should the boatman’s sharp eyes attend? Would Charon risk eye contact with the dead? And if he did, would he see human souls as types, or individuals—is it the commonness of human suffering, or its specificity, even singularity, that bears value? On what grounds might a literally restless boatman stand, were he to make such distinctions?

We may come closest to seeing from Charon’s point of view when we attend to photographs that depict human suffering. (The English word “suffer” is drawn from the Latin root ferre, “to bear,” and the prefix sub, “from below.” The naive view that photographs are inherently truth-telling enhances our strong reactions to what photographs of people in pain “bring up.” This naivete may be ironical, in that photography is associated with modernity and “progress.”) As they compose arguments and essays and real-time PPTX presentations that engage with and argue about some of the most difficult-to-read images ever made, they will grapple with the question “What strengths and weaknesses does writing and rhetoric afford us, when we want to bear human suffering into academic discourse?”


Course: ENG 181 – Writing About Literature
Section: 
3
Topic: 
Charon’s Keen Gaze
Instructor: 
Daniel Bosch
Meets: 
TuTh 09:40 – 10:55 White Hall 112
Description:
The mythological ferryman’s name is drawn from the ancient Greek charopós, “of keen gaze.” But to what, in the dim light of the underworld, should the boatman’s sharp eyes attend? Would Charon risk eye contact with the dead? And if he did, would he see human souls as types, or individuals—is it the commonness of human suffering, or its specificity, even singularity, that bears value? On what grounds might a literally restless boatman stand, were he to make such distinctions?

We may come closest to seeing from Charon’s point of view when we attend to photographs that depict human suffering. (The English word “suffer” is drawn from the Latin root ferre, “to bear,” and the prefix sub, “from below.” The naive view that photographs are inherently truth-telling enhances our strong reactions to what photographs of people in pain “bring up.” This naivete may be ironical, in that photography is associated with modernity and “progress.”) As they compose arguments and essays and real-time PPTX presentations that engage with and argue about some of the most difficult-to-read images ever made, they will grapple with the question “What strengths and weaknesses does writing and rhetoric afford us, when we want to bear human suffering into academic discourse?”

Course: ENGRD 202 Multilieracy Tutor Practicum
Section: 
1
Instructor: 
Mandy Suhr-Sytsma, Levin Arnsperger
Meets:
 W 19:30 – 20:30 online
Description:
(Permission required prior to enrollment) This practicum course is designed as a companion to first semester experience as a Writing Center tutor. Tutors will have a chance to reflect on their tutoring experiences and discuss tutoring strategies. They will also learn about writing in different disciplines, promoting transfer of skills, and tutoring non-native speakers of English. And they will conduct academic and practical research related to their tutoring work.

Course: ENGRD 223 – Rhetorical Grammar
Section:
 1
Instructor: 
Sarah Harsh
Online only; does not meet
Description:
The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. In reality, grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader. Text: Kolln, Martha and Loretta Gray. Rhetorical Grammar: Grammatical Choices, Rhetorical Effects. 8th Ed. 978-0-13-408037-6

Course: ENGRD 223 – Rhetorical Grammar
Section: 
2
Instructor: 
Sarah Harsh
Online only; does not meet
Description:
The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. In reality, grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader. Text: Kolln, Martha and Loretta Gray. Rhetorical Grammar: Grammatical Choices, Rhetorical Effects. 8th Ed. 978-0-13-408037-6

Course: ENGRD 223 – Rhetorical Grammar
Section: 
3
Instructor: Brandon Wicks
Meets: 
F 16:20 – 17:35 online
Description: 
The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. In reality, grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader. Text: Kolln, Martha and Loretta Gray. Rhetorical Grammar: Grammatical Choices, Rhetorical Effects. 8th Ed. 978-0-13-408037-6

Course: ENGRD 223 – Rhetorical Grammar
Section: 
4
Instructor: 
Brandon Wicks
Meets: 
F 18:00 – 19:15 online
Description: 
The notion of good grammar makes most of us think of getting it right or being correct. In reality, grammar is all about choices, and these choices are made to forward your argument, help you find an audience, and make a difference with your writing. Grammatical choices are part of the writer's toolkit, helping the writer make meaning in collaboration with a reader. Text: Kolln, Martha and Loretta Gray. Rhetorical Grammar: Grammatical Choices, Rhetorical Effects. 8th Ed. 978-0-13-408037-6